Monthly Archives: May 2012

Creating Options to Design the House that Jack Built

I’ve been thinking about Michael Kennedy’s LSSC’12 talk, Set-Based Decision Making – Taming System Complexity to Ensure Project Success and ways to explain it to those who weren’t there at the conference. Kennedy’s ideas go well beyond set-based design or … Continue reading

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LSSC’12 Report, Batch 3

I’m continuing reporting my impressions from the 2012 Lean Systems Society Conference that took place in Boston last week. The start of my report is in these two posts: Batch 1 and Batch 2. Benjamin Mitchell: What Comes After Visualizing … Continue reading

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A Digression from My LSSC’12 Report

I’m interrupting my LSSC’12 report with a short update from the real world. (The first two batches of the report are here: Batch 1 and Batch 2). I had to submit the annual employee survey – it’s a long SurveyMonkey … Continue reading

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LSSC’12 Report, Batch 2

I’m continuing to write those perishable thoughts out of my head after attending the Lean Systems Society Conference in Boston last week. Batch 1 is here, more to follow. Again, in no particular order… Jeff Anderson: Enabling Enterprise Kanban Transformation … Continue reading

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LSSC’12 Report Batch 1

I came back from LSSC’12 in Boston with a lot of perishable information that I need to write down in a blog post. I am not sure about one long post actually – lets do it in small batches. In … Continue reading

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The Elusive 20% Time

The 20% time has become popular in the software industry in recent years. Even though most programmers don’t work at companies that have 20% time, most have heard or know someone who works at a place like Google, where programmers … Continue reading

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The Bull’s-Eye Kanban Experiment

A couple of months ago I decided that it was time to try something different and erased my Personal Kanban board where all lines crossed each other at 90-degree angles. I thought it was time to experiment with a radically … Continue reading

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